Why “doing what you love and not working a day in your life” is a myth

Why “doing what you love and not working a day in your life” is a myth

Myth: “If you do what you love you won’t work a day in your life”   They say that following your passion is effortless, requires no work, creates no stress and is otherwise easy. No they don’t normally say that word for word but there’s some insinuation, isn’t there? You’ve all heard it before, the cliche statement. The one that says “If you do what you love, you won’t work a day in your life.   If you’re like me, (and you probably are to some level,) you’ve fallen victim to this myth. Allow me to explain. You find something you love, something you’re “passionate” about. You go in head first and begin chasing that passion. Almost instantly you run into trouble, an obstacle or an issue. That of course leads to stress, which leads to anxiety, which removes the joy from your “passion,” which finally leads you to the conclusion. The conclusion that you no longer love doing what you’re doing, that you are no longer passionate about it. This will likely result in a departure from your passion. I have been here before, many times!   So what happens here? Did your passion fade? Do you conclude that you are evolving, and due to this evolution your dreams change and your passions come and go? Maybe it’s because you found that passion was hard. Doing what you love was work after all. Not only would you have to work but you would have to sacrifice for it!   Reality: “If you do what you love you will work every minute of your life”   Now that we’ve...
How watching the success of others can hurt you

How watching the success of others can hurt you

Have you ever paid attention to a horse’s eyes in a race? You’ll notice they often wear something over their eyes called “blinders.” One reason for this is to help protect their eyes from dirt and dust… But the main reason is a bit more important. They are often strapped with these eye covers to keep them focused straight ahead. Horses have peripheral vision, they can see behind them and all around each side. This can cause a problem in a race because if a horse gets scared or distracted, it may run off course, or worse, collide with another racer. For the jockey, it is important to ensure that the horse looks only straight ahead. It does the horse no good to see what the others are doing. In fact, it does not matter what the others are doing. In the race, it is entirely up to each animal to win. What the others do makes no difference. It must only do everything in its own power and strength to win. It must stay in it’s own lane, and run with everything it’s got.   Stop watching what everyone else is doing. Unfortunately we often find ourselves in a situation similar to that of the scared horse. The one in the race that can’t keep it’s eyes on the track. We look around, wide-eyed, watching everyone else run their race and we lose hope. We see others success and we get discouraged. We see people do things that we want to be doing and they have progress and we ourselves seem to be spinning in circles. I am...
Give yourself permission to do great things

Give yourself permission to do great things

The other day I received my proof copy of the book I have been working on for the past 6 months. My hands were slightly shaky when I first opened the package, delivered by the FedEx guy with questionably short shorts. The anxiety and the excitement came together in a blend of emotions that quickly turned into one of the greatest feelings of accomplishment I have had yet. I felt victorious holding what was first created in the mind, visualized daily for over half a year, and now, physically sitting in the palm of my hand. Out of the mind came a manifestation of what was once only an idea. “Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.” -Napoleon Hill   Give yourself permission  I don’t believe that we give ourselves enough credit when it comes to thinking big. Because when we first birth an idea in the mind, and before anyone ever gives their approval, we’ve already allowed our minds to wander and dream so big that our ideas actually scare the hell out of us. We can already see the finish line. I know there are things you have imagined doing or creating that you have never told anyone about, but have thought about endlessly. That crazy business idea, that new invention, that book you’ve been wanting to write for so long. But when it comes to doing it, we tie and bound ourselves so tight in our minds that we choke any action out of existence. We want permission before we can proceed. We subtly hint at the idea around others in a hope...
How to find your life’s purpose

How to find your life’s purpose

At the age of 14, Australian James Harrison found himself in the hospital with 100 stitches and a missing lung. With his lung being removed due to an illness, James needed almost 2 gallons of replacement blood in order to survive the operation. Doctors were able to get the necessary blood needed for James because of donors that he later realized he would never be able to thank. James wanted to give back because of the people that saved his life and dedicated himself to give blood as soon as he turned 18 and started to do so every 3 weeks. Around this time, doctors were battling cases of a potentially fatal condition that occurs in some pregnant women. The disease often shows up when the mother and her fetus have opposite blood types causing her antibodies to attack the fetus’s red blood cells. Scientists were looking for a way to stop this reaction that was killing thousands of babies every year and that’s when James got a call from the doctors. They believed that he had the answer in his blood due to the donations he took into his body when he was 14. It was a rare antibody known as Rh (D) or anti-D. James worked with doctors by donating his blood while they worked on the medication and every batch had James’s blood in it. For 60 years he donated blood every two-three weeks and was recognized by The Guinness Book of World Records for the most blood donated by one person, over 1,000 donations. It is estimated James has already saved the lives of about...
Don’t listen to speak, listen to understand

Don’t listen to speak, listen to understand

Being polite means waiting for the other person to pull their hand out of the Doritos bag before you reach in for a handful. Nobody likes your cheesed fingers brushing up against their hand. There just isn’t enough room in a potato chip bag for two adult hands. Just like waiting for the other person to finish speaking is also “polite” but that’s not what it means to really listen in a conversation. I thought I was a great listener. I finally learned to shut my mouth and let the other person finish speaking before I jumped in and rambled out my two cents and I was proud of myself for that. Previously, whether I was arguing with my lady, discussing football or politics with a group of friends, or dissecting business plans with my partners, I was always interrupting people because I either thought I already knew what they were trying to say or felt like my point of view was just more important. Turns out, I am still a terrible listener. I did not become a better listener as I had originally thought, I just became more polite. Good communication starts with listening but there is much more to the “listening” part than just waiting for your chance to speak.   Conversation is not always communication When I talk about the importance of listening, I am not talking about in the day to day conversations here, I’m talking about the ones where real communication needs to occur. When your marriage, your business, your job, or your friendship may be on the line. The problem rarely comes from...

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